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Editorial

Ian Edwin Cock1,2
1Environmental Futures Research Institute, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.
2School of Natural Sciences, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, 170 Kessels Rd, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.

Pharmacognosy Communications,2019,9,2,38.
DOI:10.5530/pc.2019.2.9
Published: April 2019
Type: Editorial

ABSTRACT
several pathogenic diseases and determined their antioxidant contents. Two other studies examined the antibacterial properties of the Australian plant species Callistemon linearis Schrad. and J.C. Wendl. and Mischarytera lauteriana (F.M. Bailey) respectively. Similarly, another study examined the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of Prosopis
cineraria, an important plant in Indian medicinal systems. The final study included in this issue reports that Piper novae-hollandiae Miq. leaf extracts lack antibacterial activity. Whilst this is a negative result, it is interesting as closely related plant species often share similar secondary metabolites and bioactivities. Indeed, the genus Piper has a long history of medicinal usage in many areas of the world and many Piper spp. have therapeutic properties, including antibacterial bioactivities. Thus, this species was considered a good candidate for antibacterial activity screening. The publication of negative results such as this are important so that valuable time and resources are not wasted by other groups repeating these tests.Read more. . .

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