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Ian E. Cock1,21Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.2School of Natural Sciences, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA. Dear Readers and Authors I am pleased to bring you Volume 14, Issue 2 of Pharmacognosy Communications. In this issue, we present several studies, including an upscaled protocol for the extraction of antibacterial compounds from Terminalia ferdinandiana leaves. This study compares and contrasts the yields and bioactivity of the extracts produced by this upscaled method and compares it to laboratory scale pilot extraction protocols. Another study presented in this issue evaluates the…

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Jinwoo Kim1, Enoch John Rusford1, Gagan Tiwana1, Sean Robert Alcorn1, Ian Edwin Cock2,3, Matthew James Cheesman1,*1School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Gold Coast, AUSTRALIA.2School of Environment and Science, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA.3Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.9 ABSTRACT Background: Terminalia ferdinandiana Exell. fruit have been used by the First Australians as a nutritious food and as a medicine for thousands of years. The antibacterial properties of T. ferdinandiana fruit extracts are well reported. However, the therapeutic potential of plants growing in different locations and…

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Haokang Xu1, Ian Edwin Cock1,2,*1School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA.2Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.10 ABSTRACT Background: Terminalia ferdinandiana Exell. is an endemic Australian plant with a high anti-oxidant capacity. Liquid solvent extractions of T. ferdinandiana leaves are strong inhibitors of the growth of numerous bacterial pathogens. Despite these promising therapeutic properties, methods for the rapid extraction of large quantities of T. ferdinandiana leaves are lacking. This study aimed to develop a rapid supercritical extraction method to produce extracts which retain therapeutic properties and phytochemistry characteristics. Materials and Methods: Terminalia…

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Ian Edwin Cock1,2,*, Michael Whitehouse21Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Griffith University, Nathan, AUSTRALIA.2School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Nathan, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.11 ABSTRACT Introduction: Nanotechnology is promising for the development of new effective medicines. Silver nanoparticle preparations have been particularly well studied and a range of beneficial effects have been identified. Despite this, the sale of Colloidal silver (CS) preparations for therapeutic purposes has been banned by multiple regulatory authorities (including the FDA and TGA) on the basis of their perceived toxicity. This study evaluates the toxicity of electrolytically produced (CS) preparation, as well as some compounds…

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Ian Edwin Cock1, 2,*, Michael Whitehouse21Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Griffith University, Nathan, AUSTRALIA.2School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Nathan, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.12 ABSTRACT Introduction: Nanotechnology is promising for the development of new effective medicines. Silver nanoparticle preparations have been particularly well studied and a range of beneficial effects have been identified. Despite this, the sale of Colloidal silver (CS) preparations for therapeutic purposes has been banned by multiple regulatory authorities (including the FDA and TGA) on the basis of their perceived toxicity. This study evaluates the toxicity of electrolytically produced (CS) preparation, as well as some…

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Ian E Cock1,21School of Environment and Science, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.2Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.13 In the aftermath of the height of the SARS-CoV-2 viral pandemic that resulted in considerable mortality and brought the world to a standstill for several years, epidemiologists and virologists are concerned about the next pandemic. Whilst the effects of COVID-19 are still being felt globally (especially by those experiencing ‘long COVID’) the focus of many researchers and clinicians has now turned to predicting when and where the next pandemic will…

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Ian E Cock1,2,*1Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA.2School of Environment and Science, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.2.14 Figure 1: Australian acacia spp. The genus Acacia (family Fabaceae) is a large genus of more than 1200 trees and shrubs which are widely distributed throughout the world, with more than 700 species indigenous to Australia. The Australian species had multiple medicinal uses by indigenous Australians, including being used to treat diarrhoea and hyperglycemia1 and as a general antiseptic agent.2-5 Many Australian Acacia species have been reported to have…

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Disclaimer: The following conference dates and details have been provided using currently available information. Due to the Rapidly changing nature of the current COVID-19 pandemic and the changes that may become necessary to due to local regulations and/or to ensure safety, these conferences may change prior to their commencement date. All reasonable attempts have been made to check and ensure the validity of these details. However, potential delegates are recommended to check these details with the conference organisers closer to the commencement date. Furthermore, as different regions and countries have different travel restrictions and requirements, it is strongly recommended that…

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Ian Edwin Cock1,2 1School of Environment and Science, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA. 2Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.1.1 Dear Readers and Authors I am pleased to bring you Volume 14, Issue 1 of Pharmacognosy Communications. In this issue, we present a review of the use of Ayuvedic plant Annona reticulta, examining its phytochemistry and pharmacological properties. This issue also presents a review of the ethnobotany, phytochemistry and medicinal properties of Australian native Terminalia spp. Additionally, we present a study evaluating the antibacterial activity of Taraxacum offininale (L.) Weber ex…

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Kavya Shree Basappa1 , Sri Raghava2 , Sharanaiah Umesha1, * 1Department of Studies in Biotechnology, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore, Karnataka, INDIA. 2Department of Biotechnology, Karnataka State Open University, Muktagangotri, Mysore, Karnataka, INDIA. DOI: 10.5530/pc.2024.1.2 ABSTRACT As old as humanity itself, medicinal plants have been used to treat illnesses. The use of medicinal herbs has not decreased despite any scientific advancement. The history of the relationship between mankind and the search for drugs predates now. There used to be a dearth of information regarding therapeutic plants, but his search never came to an end. Man’s long-running battles with disease prompted…

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